Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Item

The characteristics and life difficulties associated to non-suicidal self-injury and suicidality in a community sample.

Abstract
Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) is a complex and understudied topic within the New Zealand literature. Risk factors, and functions of NSSI and suicidality within the socio-cultural context of New Zealand is an important area of research, having both clinical and research implications, such as enhancing or fuelling further investigation into prevention and therapeutic strategies. A revised version of the Survey of College and Mental Health and Well Being and the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (21) were used to explore NSSI, mental health, physical health and other characteristics of participants. Surveys were anonymous and self-selected by New Zealand community members. There were 304 participants, primarily identifying as female and of European descent. Young women were the highest risk demographic for engagement in NSSI. Psychological distress, any type of abuse, suicidality, and experiencing the suicide of a friend or acquaintance were significant predictors of participant’s engagement in NSSI. Multiple types of abuse and experiencing the death of a family member or friend to suicide significantly predicted suicidality, suggesting merit for acquired capability theory. Emotional regulation remains the most endorsed function of NSSI. There is no type of abuse that correlates to a function of NSSI, which highlights the complexity and idiosyncrasy of NSSI for each individual. Clinicians should focus on the behaviours’ functions specific for that individual to promote positive treatment outcomes.
Type
Thesis
Type of thesis
Series
Citation
Robertson, C. R. (2021). The characteristics and life difficulties associated to non-suicidal self-injury and suicidality in a community sample. (Thesis, Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/14371
Date
2021
Publisher
The University of Waikato
Supervisors
Rights
All items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.