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What do we know about the intersection of being blind and being Māori in Aotearoa New Zealand? Taking an applied community psychology approach to a systematic review of the published literature

Abstract
Self-determination and dignity are guaranteed rights for disabled persons under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. However, such rights have been slow to eventuate for Maori (Indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand). This paper brings together systematic fashion publications that currently exist regarding blindness and Maori, centring throughout Maori understandings of disability and blindness. We employed a structured approach alongside PRISMA protocols and reflexive dialogue. Included publications were quantitative data reviews, surveys, qualitative studies, literature reviews, and works of fiction. For our analysis, we formulated a matrix that drew from Kaupapa Maori, applied community psychology, and disability rights literature. This meant we made explicit where research practices included—and excluded—self-determination, democratic participation, and inclusion of both disabled and Maori. Our review highlights inconsistency across disciplines regarding self-determination and democratic participation by both Maori and disabled key stakeholders. Our approach can be utilised across disciplines as a tool for considering the ways in which researchers uphold Indigenous self-determination, disability rights, and data sovereignty. Please refer to the Supplementary Material section to find this article's Community and Social Impact Statement.
Type
Journal Article
Type of thesis
Series
Citation
Date
2023
Publisher
Wiley
Degree
Supervisors
Rights
This is an open-access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License. © 2023 The Authors.