Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Item

Intelligent accountability evaluation of New Zealand primary school principals’ formal appraisal processes

Abstract
Internationally there is interest in decentralising education and in the quality of school principals. In this article, Terry Crooks’ (2007) seven principles for intelligent accountability are applied to formal appraisal of primary school principals in the context of New Zealand’s self-managing schools. These principles are used to explore the dimensions and tensions associated with the process and principals’ experience of appraisal. Qualitative methods generated evidence, from three interviews with six principals over an 18-month period. Principals approved of their work being appraised for professional (and school) development. The strengths, according to Crooks’ intelligent accountability criteria, were principal involvement and feedback. The weaknesses were flexibility of monitoring and developing deep learning. Enhancement of trust depended on the appraiser and on the recognition of the limitations of appraisal indicators. Outcomes of this study have implications for appraisal policy and principal preparation programs.
Type
Journal Article
Type of thesis
Series
Citation
Earl Rinehart, (Suzanne) K. (2019). Intelligent accountability evaluation of New Zealand primary school principals’ formal appraisal processes. Leading and Managing, 25(1), 72–88.
Date
2019
Publisher
Australian Council for Education Leaders
Degree
Supervisors
Rights
This article is published in the Leading & Managing. © 2019 Australian Council for Educational Laders. Used with permission.