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Audiences, referees, and landscapes: Understanding the use of Māori and English in New Zealand dual language picturebooks through a sociolinguistic lens

Abstract
When non-dominant perspectives are represented in children's literature, it is labelled multicultural, and this form of literature has much potential for altering existing power structures in society. Bishop (1990) first introduced the metaphor of multicultural children's literature offering the possibility of windows - an opportunity to see into others' worlds; mirrors - an opportunity to see your own world being reflected back; and glass sliding doors - an opportunity to step into a world through a book. However, to date, any exploration of the extent to which language diversity contributes to the representation of non-dominant perspectives in multicultural children's literature has been limited, and the use of sociolinguistic theories to frame and theorise such explorations almost non-existent.
Type
Chapter in Book
Type of thesis
Series
Citation
Daly, N. (2017). Audiences, referees, and landscapes: Understanding the use of Māori and English in New Zealand dual language picturebooks through a sociolinguistic lens. In M. Marra & P. Warren (Eds.), Linguist at Work: Festschrift for Janet Holmes (pp. 159–176). Wellington, New Zealand: Victoria University Press.
Date
2017
Publisher
Victoria University Press
Degree
Supervisors
Rights
© 2017 copyright with the author.