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Retained primitive reflexes: Perceptions of parents who have used Rhythmic Movement Training with their children

Abstract
This article reports on a qualitative phenomenological research project that investigated the use of Rhythmic Movement Training (RMT) as an intervention for retained primitive reflexes. Participants were from seven families who each had a child between the ages of 7 years and 12 years. Through semi-structured interviews, parents described their reasons for seeking additional help with their child’s development issues. They talked about finding RMT, using RMT within their family routine and their views on the costs and the benefits they experienced, both financial and time. While there has been a small amount of research into movement programmes targeting retained primitive reflexes, to date there appears to have been no studies completed on RMT. The data collected described searches for help, the stress and frustrations associated with the search and the range of interventions these parents tried. The families in this research found that RMT was easy to use within their daily routine and that it was a cost-effective, low-impact intervention. The families noticed a range of benefits for children who had completed the movements. The findings provide encouraging evidence to proceed with further study that will investigate the academic, social and emotional development of children using RMT.
Type
Journal Article
Type of thesis
Series
Citation
Grigg, T. M., Fox-Turnbull, W. H., & Culpan, I. G. (2018). Retained primitive reflexes: Perceptions of parents who have used Rhythmic Movement Training with their children. Journal of Child Health Care, 1–13. https://doi.org/10.1177/1367493518760736
Date
2018
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Degree
Supervisors
Rights
This is an author’s accepted version of an article published in the journal: Journal of Child Health Care. © 2018 the authors.