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Civilisation, settlers and wanderers: Law, politics and mobility in nineteenth century New Zealand and Australia

Abstract
Mobility was constitutive of the 19th century British colonial period in the Pacific. The circulation of capital and commodities, technologies of transportation and communication, travelling ideologies and systems of governance and surveillance, as well as the movement of explorers, whalers, labourers, settlers, missionaries, colonial administrators, convicts, soldiers, sojourners, immigrants, and transnational and displaced indigenous peoples, all shaped the politics and the period (see Ballantyne 2009: 7-8; Seuffert 2006: 7-8; Arrighi 1994: 48-58). Highly mobile British and European immigrants with money or skills were termed 'settlers', with associated connotations of stabilising and civilising influences. Missionaries and colonial officials who were integral to colonisation were also often highly mobile, carrying policies and regulatory regimes with them, and their colonial roles as 'civilising' influences included 'settling' and advancing the position of indigenous and other colonised peoples. In contrast, the mobility of poor whites and racialised populations - such as 'Melanesian' indentured labourers (Banivanua-Mar 2007: 3-4)2, Indian workers, displaced indigenous peoples and 'sojourner' Chinese - attracted the attention of law (and policy) makers and institutional authorities and were subjected to various forms of surveillance, regulation and policing designed to constrain and contain them.
Type
Journal Article
Type of thesis
Series
Citation
Seuffert, N. (2011). Civilisation, settlers and wanderers: Law, politics and mobility in nineteenth century New Zealand and Australia. Law Text Culture, 15, 10-44.
Date
2011
Publisher
University of Wollongong, Legal Intersections Research Centre
Degree
Supervisors
Rights
This article has been published in the journal: Law Text Culture.