Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Item

Online and in person: Beliefs about consent and viewing explicit material

Abstract
Through the process of technological advancement, it is now easier than ever to access sexually explicit material and be exposed to sexually objectified women. As social norms have changed traditional gender roles, rape myths have adapted to become less overt. International studies have found that there is a significant association between the frequency of viewing sexually explicit material and an increase in rape myth acceptance. In addition to this, previous research has found that the use of sexually explicit material increases attitudes supporting violence against women. The purpose of this research was to explore the potential relationship between the frequency of use of sexually explicit material and rape myth acceptance within the New Zealand context. The first aim of the study was to measure the frequency of use of sexually explicit material in a sample of mix gendered participants (N = 297). The second aim was to investigate the level of rape myth acceptance. The third aim was to examine the possible influence consuming sexually explicit material had on rape myth acceptance. The fourth aim of the study was to investigate the influence of age on the use of sexually explicit material and rape myth acceptance. Participants completed an online questionnaire consisting of a scale to measure the frequency of use of sexually explicit material and a separate scale to measure rape myth acceptance. Findings did not confirm a significant relationship between male use of sexually explicit material and rape myth acceptance. However, a significant association was found between female use of sexually explicit material and rape myth acceptance; more sexually explicit material consumption by female participants was associated with rape myth acceptance. Furthermore, younger participants were more accepting of rape myths in comparison to older participants. The results of the study should be taken into account when developing sexual consent education programs for youth. In addition, this study has implications for the viewing of sexually explicit material and the acceptance of rape myths by women. There is a need to further understand the genres of sexually explicit material engaged with by the public and the effect this potentially has on sex crimes.
Type
Thesis
Type of thesis
Series
Citation
Singh, I. (2019). Online and in person: Beliefs about consent and viewing explicit material (Thesis, Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/12333
Date
2019
Publisher
The University of Waikato
Rights
All items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.