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School leadership for Māori succeeding as Māori: A Mataatua perspective

Abstract
This thesis recounts how Ngāti Awa leadership principles from the past became evident in Te Kotahitanga schools. The thesis discusses Principals’ actions and reflections of fostering Māori students’ success as Māori in secondary schooling. Through case studies, it identifies the strategies engaged by these effective leaders and explores their undertakings in achieving successful outcomes for Māori with whom they have worked. This study is an imperative to addressing the long-term levels of education under-achievement for Māori as indigenous people of New Zealand. The nexus for the study comes from Robinson (2007) who identified that ‘in many ways the question of how much impact [school] leaders have on student outcomes is a flawed one, because the answer surely depends on what it is that leaders do’. Marzano et al (2005) also identifies ‘the relative paucity of empirical studies’ and ‘little specific guidance as to effective practices in school leadership’. The purpose of this study is to identify the contribution effective leaders have made towards realising Durie’s (2001) landmark goals for Māori advancement, that is, for self-determining prosperity, good health and global participation. Identifying exceptional outcomes for Māori in a range of contexts establishes the criteria for selecting the case studies and therefore the foundation for the study. Successful outcomes include increased participation, better retention, improved academic achievement results and lesser disparities within the selected education sites.
Type
Thesis
Type of thesis
Series
Citation
Barrett, T. A. (2018). School leadership for Māori succeeding as Māori: A Mataatua perspective (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/12101
Date
2018
Publisher
The University of Waikato
Rights
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