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The impacts of climate change on the people of Vatukarasa and Sovi Bay, Viti Levu, Fiji.

Abstract
Abstract Climate change is one of the biggest threats facing communities around the globe in the 21st Century. Small island developing states, including all Pacific Island Countries, are often represented as being among the countries that are most exposed to its effects. This thesis seeks to better understand the impacts of climate change on two coastal communities, Vatukarasa and Sovi Bay, on the south coast of Viti Levu, the main island of Fiji. These two communities are composed of iTaukei (indigenous Fijians) and Indo-Fijians, respectively. They share a number of current and likely future problems caused by climate change although there are some differences in their levels or types of exposure reflecting different cultural backgrounds, livelihood strategies and social networks. The effects of climate change are holding back the development aspirations of the communities, a process that is likely to worsen in the years ahead. Developing sustainable and effective adaptation strategies will need to consider both the commonalities between the two communities and the differences. Some contemporary resource management practices also contribute to the environmental degradation caused by climate change and changing these is already recognised by community members as important first steps towards adapting to climate change effects. The thesis explores the potential for traditional knowledge to be embraced in adaptation that is community-based. It also recognises that some adaptation options are likely to be expensive and beyond the financial capacities of the communities without some forms of external assistance, from local and national government sources as well as the international community.
Type
Thesis
Type of thesis
Series
Citation
Nur, A. (2021). The impacts of climate change on the people of Vatukarasa and Sovi Bay, Viti Levu, Fiji. (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/14136
Date
2021
Publisher
The University of Waikato
Supervisors
Rights
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