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dc.contributor.authorHicks, Talia
dc.contributor.authorLay, Mark C.
dc.contributor.authorVerbeek, Casparus Johan R.
dc.contributor.authorManley-Harris, Merilyn
dc.coverage.spatialConference held at Wellington, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-08T01:57:06Z
dc.date.available2013-08-08T01:57:06Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationHicks, T. Verbeek, C. J. R., Lay, M. & Manley-Harris, M. (2012). Decolouring bloodmeal: Consumption and potential recycling of peracetic acid. In Proceedings of Chemeca 2012: Quality of life through chemical engineering: 23-26 September 2012, Wellington, New Zealand. (pp. 1891-1901).en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/7836
dc.description.abstractA method of deodorizing and decolouring bloodmeal using an equilibrium mixture of peracetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid and water has been developed to improve its marketability as a source of protein for bioplastics. The objective of this study was to determine what quantity of peracetic acid is required to give reasonable bleaching of the bloodmeal and determine whether there is potential for the wastewater to be recycled. This was carried out by measuring the quantity of chemical species in the initial equilibrium mixture and the resulting wastewater upon bleaching using volumetric analysis. Bleaching efficacy was determined after exposing 100 g bloodmeal to 1.1, 2.5, 3.6, 4.5 and 5.6 wt% peracetic acid solutions as either 300 g total solution or a constant molar equivalent of 2.2 mmol peracetic acid/g bloodmeal and using a chromameter to measure colour change. Addition of 300 g 5.6 wt% peracetic acid solution resulted in effective bleaching. This represented a ratio of 2.20 mmol peracetic acid/g bloodmeal of which 1.4 mmol peracetic acid/g bloodmeal was consumed (63%). If 300 g <2.5 wt% peracetic acid solution was used, there was insufficient bleaching. If >300 g of <2.5 wt% solution is added such that there is still 2.2 mmol peracetic acid/g bloodmeal, bleaching is still insufficient. These results suggest that an excess of peracetic is required for bleaching to occur, and that its concentration is paramount to bleaching efficacy. Due to the excess of peracetic acid used in the bleaching process, there is potential for wastewater recycling to be carried out provided that the wastewater is not diluted.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherEngineers Australiaen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.chemeca2012.com/en_NZ
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the proceedings of Chemeca 2012: Quality of life through chemical engineering. Used with permission.en_NZ
dc.titleDecolouring bloodmeal: Consumption and potential recycling of peracetic aciden_NZ
dc.typeConference Contributionen_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfCHEMECA 2012 - Quality of Life through Chemical Engineeringen_NZ
pubs.begin-page1891en_NZ
pubs.elements-id22878
pubs.end-page1901en_NZ
pubs.finish-date2012-09-26en_NZ
pubs.place-of-publicationBarton, A.C.T.en_NZ
pubs.start-date2012-09-23en_NZ


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