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dc.contributor.authorScoon, Craigen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKo, Ryan K.L.en_NZ
dc.coverage.spatialTianjin, Chinaen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-18T21:57:38Z
dc.date.available2016en_NZ
dc.date.available2017-04-18T21:57:38Z
dc.date.issued2016en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationScoon, C., & Ko, R. K. L. (2016). The data privacy matrix project: towards a global alignment of data privacy laws. In Proceedings of 15th IEEE International Conference on Trust, Security and Privacy in Computing and Communications (pp. 1998–2005). Washington, DC, USA: IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/TrustCom.2016.0305en
dc.identifier.isbn9781509032051en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/11000
dc.description.abstractData privacy is an expected right of most citizens around the world but there are many legislative challenges within a boundary-less cloud computing and World Wide Web environment. Despite its importance, there is limited research around data privacy law gaps and alignment, and the legal side of the security ecosystem which seems to be in a constant effort to catch-up. There are already issues within recent history which show a lack of alignment causing a great deal of confusion, an example of this is the 'right to be forgotten' case which came up in 2014. This case involved a Spanish man against Google Spain. He requested the removal of a link to an article about an auction for his foreclosed home, for a debt that he had subsequently paid. However, misalignment of data privacy laws caused further complications to the case. This paper introduces the Waikato Data Privacy Matrix, our global project for alignment of data privacy laws by focusing on Asia Pacific data privacy laws and their relationships with the European Union and the USA. This will also suggest potential solutions to address some of the issues which may occur when a breach of data privacy occurs, in order to ensure an individual has their data privacy protected across the boundaries in the Web. With the increase in data processing and storage across different jurisdictions and regions (e.g. public cloud computing), the Waikato Data Privacy Matrix empowers businesses using or providing cloud services to understand the different data privacy requirements across the globe, paving the way for increased cloud adoption and usage.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherIEEE Computer Societyen_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an author’s accepted version of an article published in the Proceedings of 15th IEEE International Conference on Trust, Security and Privacy in Computing and Communications. ©2016 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.
dc.sourceTrustCom 2016en_NZ
dc.subjectcomputer scienceen_NZ
dc.subjectLegislation alignmenten_NZ
dc.subjectdata privacy matrixen_NZ
dc.subjectcloud computingen_NZ
dc.subjectdata sovereigntyen_NZ
dc.titleThe data privacy matrix project: towards a global alignment of data privacy lawsen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/TrustCom.2016.0305en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfProceedings of 15th IEEE International Conference on Trust, Security and Privacy in Computing and Communicationsen_NZ
pubs.begin-page1998
pubs.elements-id193209
pubs.end-page2005
pubs.finish-date2016-08-26en_NZ
pubs.place-of-publicationWashington, DC, USA
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.start-date2016-08-23en_NZ


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