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dc.contributor.authorLeduc, Danielen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPilditch, Conrad A.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-09T03:08:42Z
dc.date.available2017-05-11en_NZ
dc.date.available2018-05-09T03:08:42Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-11en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationLeduc, D., & Pilditch, C. A. (2017). Estimating the effect of burrowing shrimp on deep-sea sediment community oxygen consumption. PeerJ, 5, e3309. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.3309en
dc.identifier.issn2167-8359en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/11815
dc.description.abstractSediment community oxygen consumption (SCOC) is a proxy for organic matter processing and thus provides a useful proxy of benthic ecosystem function. Oxygen uptake in deep-sea sediments is mainly driven by bacteria, and the direct contribution of benthic macro- and mega-infauna respiration is thought to be relatively modest. However, the main contribution of infaunal organisms to benthic respiration, particularly large burrowing organisms, is likely to be indirect and mainly driven by processes such as feeding and bioturbation that stimulate bacterial metabolism and promote the chemical oxidation of reduced solutes. Here, we estimate the direct and indirect contributions of burrowing shrimp (Eucalastacus cf. torbeni) to sediment community oxygen consumption based on incubations of sediment cores from 490 m depth on the continental slope of New Zealand. Results indicate that the presence of one shrimp in the sediment is responsible for an oxygen uptake rate of about 40 µmol d−1, only 1% of which is estimated to be due to shrimp respiration. We estimate that the presence of ten burrowing shrimp m−2 of seabed would lead to an oxygen uptake comparable to current estimates of macro-infaunal community respiration on Chatham Rise based on allometric equations, and would increase total sediment community oxygen uptake by 14% compared to sediment without shrimp. Our findings suggest that oxygen consumption mediated by burrowing shrimp may be substantial in continental slope ecosystems.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherPeerJen_NZ
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
dc.subjectScience & Technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectMultidisciplinary Sciencesen_NZ
dc.subjectScience & Technology - Other Topicsen_NZ
dc.subjectBurrowen_NZ
dc.subjectChatham Riseen_NZ
dc.subjectMetabolismen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectEucalastacus cf. torbenien_NZ
dc.subjectSediment community oxygen consumptionen_NZ
dc.subjectNEW-ZEALANDen_NZ
dc.subjectBENTHIC METABOLISMen_NZ
dc.subjectORGANIC-MATTERen_NZ
dc.subjectCALLIANASSA-FILHOLIen_NZ
dc.subjectECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONen_NZ
dc.subjectMARINE-SEDIMENTSen_NZ
dc.subjectCHATHAM RISEen_NZ
dc.subjectOCEANen_NZ
dc.subjectCARBONen_NZ
dc.subjectDYNAMICSen_NZ
dc.titleEstimating the effect of burrowing shrimp on deep-sea sediment community oxygen consumptionen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.7717/peerj.3309en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfPeerJen_NZ
pubs.elements-id194540
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume5en_NZ
uow.identifier.article-noe3309


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