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dc.contributor.authorHill, Richard Kennethen_NZ
dc.coverage.spatialUniversity of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-13T04:06:35Z
dc.date.available2018en_NZ
dc.date.available2018-07-13T04:06:35Z
dc.date.issued2018en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationHill, R. K. (2018). What are the perceptions of Māori bilingual-educated families towards growing up and learning the Māori language? Presented at the Sociolinguistics symposium twenty two, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/11941
dc.description.abstractThe Māori language occupies an important place as New Zealand’s indigenous language. This is despite over a century of attempts to wipe it out. The revitalisation movement from the 1980s has made a significant contribution to raise its profile and ensure younger generations of primarily Māori students can grow up learning the Māori language through school. However, significant issues still exist, as low numbers of families take advantage of bilingual education options, and remain there to develop high levels of proficiency. Attitudes of both Māori and non-Māori (Pākehā) populations towards the Māori language have been steadily improving in recent decades. There are increasing calls to make it a compulsory subject in all New Zealand schools. Whilst these are positive signs, the long term health of the Māori language is still precarious. Using the findings of recent studies into Māori bilingual school transitions, including Hill, Rameka and Skerrett (2017) and Hill (2014, 2016, 2017), this presentation seeks to unpack the perceptions of Māori students and their families from a range of programmes towards their languages (Māori and English) and their lives. The findings will illustrate that families within the Māori bilingual education context are enthusiastic about Māori language learning and being educated bilingually. They are also resolute that bilingual education will help to prepare their children for their world. However, families often differ in the extent to which they commit to high immersion programmes, thus affecting the potential success of the Māori language revitalisation aim.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urihttp://programme.exordo.com/ss22/delegates/presentation/645/
dc.rights© 2018 copyright with the author.
dc.sourceSociolinguistics symposium twenty twoen_NZ
dc.titleWhat are the perceptions of Māori bilingual-educated families towards growing up and learning the Māori language?en_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution
pubs.elements-id225684
pubs.finish-date2018-06-30en_NZ
pubs.start-date2018-06-27en_NZ


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