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dc.contributor.authorPower, Jean F.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCarere, Carlo R.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLee, Charls K.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWakerley, Georgia L.J.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorEvans, David W.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorButton, Mathewen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Duncanen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorClimo, Melissa D.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHinze, Annikaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Xochitl C.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Ian R.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCary, S. Craigen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorStott, Matthew B.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-05T21:40:47Z
dc.date.available2018-07-23en_NZ
dc.date.available2018-08-05T21:40:47Z
dc.date.issued2018en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationPower, J. F., Carere, C. R., Lee, C. K., Wakerley, G. L. J., Evans, D. W., Button, M., … Stott, M. B. (2018). Microbial biogeography of 925 geothermal springs in New Zealand. Nature Communications, 9. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-05020-yen
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12013
dc.description.abstractGeothermal springs are model ecosystems to investigate microbial biogeography as they represent discrete, relatively homogenous habitats, are distributed across multiple geographical scales, span broad geochemical gradients, and have reduced metazoan interactions. Here, we report the largest known consolidated study of geothermal ecosystems to determine factors that influence biogeographical patterns. We measured bacterial and archaeal community composition, 46 physicochemical parameters, and metadata from 925 geothermal springs across New Zealand (13.9–100.6 °C and pH < 1–9.7). We determined that diversity is primarily influenced by pH at temperatures <70 °C; with temperature only having a significant effect for values >70 °C. Further, community dissimilarity increases with geographic distance, with niche selection driving assembly at a localised scale. Surprisingly, two genera (Venenivibrio and Acidithiobacillus) dominated in both average relative abundance (11.2% and 11.1%, respectively) and prevalence (74.2% and 62.9%, respectively). These findings provide an unprecedented insight into ecological behaviour in geothermal springs, and a foundation to improve the characterisation of microbial biogeographical processes.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen_NZ
dc.rightsThis article is published under a CC BY license (Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License).
dc.subjectScience & Technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectMultidisciplinary Sciencesen_NZ
dc.subjectScience & Technology - Other Topicsen_NZ
dc.subjectYELLOWSTONE-NATIONAL-PARKen_NZ
dc.subjectGEN.-NOV.en_NZ
dc.subjectHOT-SPRINGSen_NZ
dc.subjectBACTERIAL DIVERSITYen_NZ
dc.subjectCHAMPAGNE POOLen_NZ
dc.subjectCOMMUNITYen_NZ
dc.subjectPATTERNSen_NZ
dc.subjectSOILen_NZ
dc.subjectTEMPERATUREen_NZ
dc.subjectEVOLUTIONen_NZ
dc.titleMicrobial biogeography of 925 geothermal springs in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-018-05020-yen_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfNature Communicationsen_NZ
pubs.elements-id225989
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume9en_NZ
uow.identifier.article-noARTN 2876


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