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dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Ianen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLao, Chunhuanen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBlackmore, Tania Louiseen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Melissaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Louen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorNg, Alexen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLawrenson, Rossen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-04T01:07:22Z
dc.date.available2018-12-01en_NZ
dc.date.available2019-06-04T01:07:22Z
dc.date.issued2018en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationCampbell, I., Lao, C., Blackmore, T. L., Edwards, M., Hayes, L., Ng, A., & Lawrenson, R. (2018). Surgical treatment of early stage breast cancer in the Auckland and Waikato regions of New Zealand. ANZ Journal of Surgery, 88(12), 1263–1268. https://doi.org/10.1111/ans.14840en
dc.identifier.issn1445-1433en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12591
dc.description.abstractBackground The aim of this study was to understand the factors influencing the use of surgical options by New Zealand women with newly diagnosed breast cancer. Methods Using data from the Auckland and Waikato breast cancer registers, we included 11 798 women diagnosed with stage I–III breast cancer from June 2000 to May 2013. The characteristics of women receiving different surgical treatments and having immediate breast reconstruction following mastectomy were examined. A logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio of having breast‐conserving surgery (BCS) versus mastectomy and immediate post‐mastectomy reconstruction. Bilateral breast cancer cases and women with unilateral breast cancer, but who had bilateral surgery, were also identified. Results Fifty‐two percent of women received BCS and 44% had mastectomy over the study period. Key influences associated with BCS were age, mode of diagnosis, socio‐economic status and public or private treatment. Just under half of the women who underwent bilateral surgery did not have bilateral cancer. Nineteen percent of women undergoing mastectomy underwent immediate reconstruction. Implant use increased slightly over the study period but there was a decrease in the use of autologous flap procedures. Conclusion Surgical management of women with localized breast cancer was generally in line with guidelines, but with potential to further increase the use of breast conservation and immediate reconstruction in suitable cases.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherWILEYen_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an author’s accepted version of an article published in the journal: ANZ Journal of Surgery. © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
dc.subjectScience & Technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_NZ
dc.subjectSurgeryen_NZ
dc.subjectbreast canceren_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectsurgeryen_NZ
dc.subjectCONTRALATERAL PROPHYLACTIC MASTECTOMYen_NZ
dc.subjectDECISION-MAKINGen_NZ
dc.subjectRECONSTRUCTIONen_NZ
dc.subjectSURGERYen_NZ
dc.subjectTRENDSen_NZ
dc.subjectWOMENen_NZ
dc.subjectCHOICEen_NZ
dc.titleSurgical treatment of early stage breast cancer in the Auckland and Waikato regions of New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ans.14840en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfANZ Journal of Surgeryen_NZ
pubs.begin-page1263
pubs.elements-id227194
pubs.end-page1268
pubs.issue12en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume88en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn1445-2197en_NZ


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