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dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Johnen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Cateen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-30T23:17:23Z
dc.date.available2017en_NZ
dc.date.available2019-06-30T23:17:23Z
dc.date.issued2017en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationFitzgerald, J., & Curtis, C. (2017). Non-suicidal self-injury in a New Zealand student population: Demographic and self-harm characteristics. New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 46(3), 156–163.en
dc.identifier.issn0112-109Xen_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12652
dc.description.abstractThere is an established international literature on the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). However, New Zealand information regarding prevalence, attitudes, motivation, co-morbidities, etc., is limited. In this study data were collected using an on-line survey from approximately 850 university students regarding self-injurious behaviour, risk and protective factors, mental health co-morbidity, help-seeking, and addiction. Our data revealed that 293 participants (38%) had engaged in NSSI on at least one occasion in their lifetime, elevated risk for females who were lesbian or bisexual, and different patterns of site and function of injury by gender. Given research suggesting that Māori (indigenous New Zealanders) are at elevated risk for suicide it was surprising that those identifying as Māori were at no greater risk of NSSI than those identifying as New Zealanders of European origin. Females were more likely to exhibit chronic self-injuring and more likely to engage in more ‘covert’ forms of self-injury that can be hidden or disguised (e.g., scratching and cutting on their wrists, arms or thighs) whereas males were more likely to engage in ‘overt’ forms of self-injury (e.g., banging or punching themselves or objects with their hands or head). Patterns of NSSI were similar to international comparisons, although prevalence was somewhat elevated. A number of factors differed by gender, including underlying reasons, forms, rates and increasing severity of self-injury, which add to the international literature.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Psychological Societyen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.psychology.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/NSSI-Among-Students-in-New-Zealand-private.pdfen_NZ
dc.rightsThis article is published in the New Zealand Journal of Psychology. © New Zealand Psychological Society. Used with permission.
dc.subjectNon-suicidal self-injuryen_NZ
dc.subjectNSSI
dc.subjectuniversity students
dc.subjectprevalence
dc.subjectself-harm
dc.subjectrisk factors
dc.titleNon-suicidal self-injury in a New Zealand student population: Demographic and self-harm characteristicsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.relation.isPartOfNew Zealand Journal of Psychologyen_NZ
pubs.begin-page156
pubs.elements-id217838
pubs.end-page163
pubs.issue3en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume46en_NZ


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