Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.authorRatcliffe, Joshua L.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPayne, R.J.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorSloan, T.J.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorSmith, B.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWaldron, S.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMauquoy, D.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorNewton, A.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, A.R.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, Alisonen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorAndersen, R.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-23T21:35:07Z
dc.date.available2019-01-01en_NZ
dc.date.available2019-07-23T21:35:07Z
dc.date.issued2019en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationRatcliffe, J. L., Payne, R. J., Sloan, T. J., Smith, B., Waldron, S., Mauquoy, D., … Andersen, R. (2019). Holocene carbon accumulation in the peatlands of northern Scotland. Mires and Peat, 23. https://doi.org/10.19189/MaP.2018.OMB.347en
dc.identifier.issn1819-754Xen_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12724
dc.description.abstractThe response of peatland carbon accumulation to climate can be complex, with internal feedbacks and processes that can dampen or amplify responses to external forcing. Records of carbon accumulation from peat cores provide a record of carbon which persists as peat over long periods of time, demonstrating the long-term response of peatland carbon stocks to climatic events. Numerous records of long-term carbon accumulation exist globally. However, peatlands from oceanic climates, and particularly blanket bog, remain underrepresented. Scottish bogs, which collectively have more than 475 separate palaeoecological records, may prove to be a valuable resource for studying the impact of environmental change on past rates of carbon accumulation. Here we present 12 records of carbon accumulation from the north of Scotland. We support these results with a further 43 records where potential carbon accumulation is inferred from published ages. These reveal a trend of high carbon accumulation in the early Holocene, declining in the mid-to-late Holocene. The trend is consistent with accumulation profiles from other northern peatlands and is likely to have been caused by climatic cooling. Considerable variability in carbon accumulation rates between locations is apparent for the mid-to-late Holocene. We attribute to hydrologically induced changes in carbon accumulation which are likely to be inconsistent between sites.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherInternational Mire Conservation Group and International Peatland Societyen_NZ
dc.rights© 2018 International Mire Conservation Group and International Peatland Society
dc.subjectScience & Technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_NZ
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciencesen_NZ
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences & Ecologyen_NZ
dc.subjectblanket bogen_NZ
dc.subjectCaithnessen_NZ
dc.subjectclimateen_NZ
dc.subjectFlow Countryen_NZ
dc.subjectLORCAen_NZ
dc.subjectpeaten_NZ
dc.subjectSutherlanden_NZ
dc.subjecttephrochronologyen_NZ
dc.subjectKENAI PENINSULA LOWLANDSen_NZ
dc.subjectNET ECOSYSTEM EXCHANGEen_NZ
dc.subjectPEAT BOGSen_NZ
dc.subjectOMBROTROPHIC PEATLANDSen_NZ
dc.subjectEDDY COVARIANCEen_NZ
dc.subjectWESTERN CANADAen_NZ
dc.subjectCLIMATE-CHANGEen_NZ
dc.subjectFLOW COUNTRYen_NZ
dc.subjectSCOTS PINEen_NZ
dc.subjectPOLLENen_NZ
dc.titleHolocene carbon accumulation in the peatlands of northern Scotlanden_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.19189/MaP.2018.OMB.347en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfMires and Peaten_NZ
pubs.elements-id235609
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume23en_NZ
uow.identifier.article-noARTN 03


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record