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dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Christopher John Gilderen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBowen, Judyen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHinze, Annikaen_NZ
dc.contributor.editorBernhaupt, Reginaen_NZ
dc.contributor.editorDalvi, Girishen_NZ
dc.contributor.editorJoshi, Anirudhaen_NZ
dc.contributor.editorBalkrishan, Devanuj K.en_NZ
dc.contributor.editorO'Neill, Jackien_NZ
dc.contributor.editorWinckler, Marcoen_NZ
dc.coverage.spatialIndian Inst Technol, Mumbai, INDIAen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-16T22:40:45Z
dc.date.available2017-01-01en_NZ
dc.date.available2019-10-16T22:40:45Z
dc.date.issued2017en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationGriffiths, C. J. G., Bowen, J., & Hinze, A. (2017). Investigating Wearable Technology for Fatigue Identification in the Workplace. In R. Bernhaupt, G. Dalvi, A. Joshi, D. K. Balkrishan, J. O’Neill, & M. Winckler (Eds.), Human-Computer Interaction - INTERACT 2017 (Vol. 10514, pp. 370–380). Indian Inst Technol, Mumbai, INDIA: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-67684-5_22en
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-67683-8en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn0302-9743en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12966
dc.description.abstractFatigue has been identified as a significant contributor to workplace accident rates. However, risk minimisation is a process largely based on self-reporting methodologies, which are not suitable for fatigue identification in high risk industries. Wearable technology which is capable of collecting physiological data such as step and heart rates as an individual performs workplace tasks has been proposed as a possible solution. Such devices are minimally intrusive to the individual and so can be used throughout the working day. Much is promised by the providers of such technology, but it is unclear how suitable it is for in-situ measurements in real-world work scenarios. To investigate this, we performed a series of studies designed to capture physiological and psychological data under differing (physical and mental) loading types with the intention of finding out how suitable such equipment is. Using reaction time (simple and choice) as a measure of performance we found similar correlations exist between loading duration and our measured indicators as those found in large-scale laboratory studies using state of the art equipment. Our results suggest that commercially available activity monitors are capable of collecting meaningful data in workplaces and are, therefore, worth investigating further for this purpose.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringeren_NZ
dc.rights© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2017.This is the author's accepted version. The final publication is available at Springer via dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-67684-5_22
dc.source16th IFIP TC 13 International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (INTERACT)en_NZ
dc.subjectScience & Technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectTechnologyen_NZ
dc.subjectComputer Science, Artificial Intelligenceen_NZ
dc.subjectComputer Science, Theory & Methodsen_NZ
dc.subjectComputer Scienceen_NZ
dc.subjectPHYSICAL-ACTIVITYen_NZ
dc.subjectREACTION-TIMEen_NZ
dc.subjectHEART-RATEen_NZ
dc.subjectPERFORMANCEen_NZ
dc.subjectWORKLOADen_NZ
dc.subjectVALIDATIONen_NZ
dc.subjectMONITORen_NZ
dc.subjectSTRESSen_NZ
dc.subjectSYSTEMen_NZ
dc.subjectCOLDen_NZ
dc.titleInvestigating Wearable Technology for Fatigue Identification in the Workplaceen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-67684-5_22en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfHuman-Computer Interaction - INTERACT 2017en_NZ
pubs.begin-page370
pubs.declined2017-06-13T16:01:20.827+1200
pubs.elements-id194716
pubs.end-page380
pubs.finish-date2017-09-29en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.start-date2017-09-25en_NZ
pubs.volume10514en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn1611-3349en_NZ


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