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dc.contributor.authorHall, Joshuaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCope, Eden_NZ
dc.contributor.authorTownsend, Robert C.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, Adam R.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-21T01:41:08Z
dc.date.available2021-01-21T01:41:08Z
dc.date.issued2020en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationHall, J., Cope, E., Townsend, R. C., & Nicholls, A. R. (2020). Investigating the alignment between coaches’ ideological beliefs and academy philosophy in professional youth football. Sport, Education and Society. https://doi.org/10.1080/13573322.2020.1856061en
dc.identifier.issn1357-3322en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/14076
dc.description.abstractThe impacts of professional sporting culture and institutional discourse on coaching practices and ideologies have largely been unconsidered and undiscussed. Understanding coaching practice from a social perspective can provide insights into the prevailing culture that coaches are immersed within, pointing to patterns of discourse, norms and values that govern coaches’ actions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for (mis)alignment between coaches’ ideological beliefs and the instituted philosophy of the professional football academy at which they worked. Thirteen male football coaches (M = 36.23 years) were observed coaching on three separate occasions, equating to 2584 min of footage (M = 66.26 min). Each recorded session was analysed using a computerised version of the Coach Analysis Intervention System (CAIS). All participants were interviewed twice (before first observation and after final observation). Coaches were questioned about the academy philosophy and their personal behavioural profiles. Data were subjected to thematic analysis and placed within a theoretical framework utilising concepts of Pierre Bourdieu. Findings highlighted that coaches’ interpretations of the academy philosophy were impacted by their prior socialisation and position within the status hierarchy. The data also demonstrated ‘philosophy’ being used as a ‘buzzword’ throughout the academy, derived from loose interpretations, but offered few specific suggestions regarding how coaches ‘should’ behave. Coach interactions were used as forms of social control rather than addressing pedagogical concerns, with coaches’ personal dispositions proving extremely strong and ultimately prevailing. It is worth questioning, therefore, the extent to which the academy ‘philosophy’ can be displaced, and the mechanisms required to ensure collective acceptance to an instituted coaching approach.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)en_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an author’s accepted version of an article published in the journal: Sport, Education and Society. © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
dc.titleInvestigating the alignment between coaches’ ideological beliefs and academy philosophy in professional youth footballen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13573322.2020.1856061en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfSport, Education and Societyen_NZ
pubs.elements-id258389


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