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dc.contributor.authorCowie, Bronwenen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Francesen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorTrask, Suzanne Adeleen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-08T02:22:10Z
dc.date.available2021-06-08T02:22:10Z
dc.date.issued2021en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationCowie, B., Edwards, F., & Trask, S. A. (2021). Explicating the value of standardized educational achievement data and a protocol for collaborative analysis of this data. Frontiers in Education, 6. https://doi.org/10.3389/feduc.2021.619319en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/14364
dc.description.abstractGovernments expect teachers to be able to make sense of and take action on data at various levels of aggregation. In our research we collaborated with 13 teachers from six primary schools and one intermediate school to use a Data Conversation Protocol to analyze and act on mathematics assessment data generated through a standardized assessment tool—the Progressive Achievement Test (PAT). Our intention was to optimize teacher use of this data for pedagogical decision making and action. At team meetings, the teachers co-constructed then refined a taken-as-shared definition for teacher data literacy for instructional action, which acted to inform and anchor our collaborative research. Data were collected in all teacher meetings and via interviews. Initial findings indicate that a ‘Data Conversation Protocol’ is helping teachers to slow down the process of considering, interpreting and making a judgement about their students’ understanding thereby opening up a space for deeper consideration of the range of possible reasons for student responses to assessment items. Students responded positively to teachers’ data informed small group teaching, gaining in understanding and confidence. Teachers considered this confidence translated to more positive engagement with mathematical ideas. Patterns and trends in student responses emerging from the teachers’ collaborative analysis of standard data supported a shift from viewing student responses as linked to student or school characteristics to critical analysis of how their teaching approaches might have contributed to student answers/misunderstandings. This finding has implications for how we might challenge assumptions about students through a willingness to engage critically with student achievement data. The importance of teachers having a rich pedagogical content knowledge as a basis for this was clearly evident.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherFrontiers in Education
dc.rightsCopyright © 2021 Cowie, Edwards and Trask. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
dc.subjectdata literacy
dc.subjectdata conversation protocol
dc.subjectpedagogical decision making and action
dc.subjectstandardized data
dc.subjectmathematics
dc.titleExplicating the value of standardized educational achievement data and a protocol for collaborative analysis of this dataen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/feduc.2021.619319en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfFrontiers in Educationen_NZ
pubs.elements-id260972
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume6en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn2504-284Xen_NZ


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