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dc.contributor.authorFrawley, Patsieen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWilson, N.J.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorDavid, Jenniferen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorO'Shea, Amieen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorJosefsson, K. Areskougen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-18T01:29:10Z
dc.date.available2022-10-18T01:29:10Z
dc.date.issued2022-06-02en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1868-9884en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/15252
dc.description.abstractIntroduction People with intellectual and developmental disabilities under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) have the right to access sexual health services including information, education, and support. Little is known about the capacity of sexual health professionals to provide these services. Methods Using an observational research design, this study utilised a descriptive survey tool (PASH–Ext) that also encompassed a standardised measure, with a cross-sectional purposive sample of 52 Australian sexual health professionals. Data was collected in 2020. Results Just over half of the participants reported having received training in their preservice education to work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, of these 60% held the view that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities would not feel embarrassed receiving sexual health information and support. Conclusion The study found that training is both important to the professionals’ preparedness to work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and that these professionals advocate for the continuation of this training in pre-service courses and additional training in post service education for sexual health workers. Policy Implications To progressively realise Article 25 of the UNCRPD signatory, countries need to ensure sexual health services are accessible to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This study recommends that sexual health policy addresses equity of access for people with intellectual and developmental disability by ensuring all staff are prepared and supported to provide these services.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherSpringeren_NZ
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
dc.subjectSocial Sciencesen_NZ
dc.subjectSocial Sciences, Interdisciplinaryen_NZ
dc.subjectSocial Sciences - Other Topicsen_NZ
dc.subjectIntellectual and developmental disabilityen_NZ
dc.subjectSexual healthen_NZ
dc.subjectSexual health trainingen_NZ
dc.subjectSexual health policyen_NZ
dc.subjectDisability awarenessen_NZ
dc.subjectSTUDENTS ATTITUDESen_NZ
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen_NZ
dc.subjectRELIABILITYen_NZ
dc.subjectVALIDITYen_NZ
dc.titleAccess to sexual health services and support for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities: an Australian cross-sector surveyen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s13178-022-00734-7en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfSexuality Research and Social Policyen_NZ
pubs.elements-id270891
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn1553-6610en_NZ


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