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dc.contributor.authorHosseini, Seyed Hosseinen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorGurney, Lauraen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-23T22:48:48Z
dc.date.available2022-11-23T22:48:48Z
dc.date.issued2022en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1173-6135en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/15356
dc.description.abstractThe doctoral research process has been metaphorically described as a “journey” (Edwards & Mackay, 2012; McAlpine & Amundsen, 2009; Rath & Mutch, 2014; Skakni, 2018a, 2018b). While the doctoral journey has the potential to present destabilising experiences, discomfort and cognitive dissonance, candidates bring their own reasons and motivations to the process (Skakni, 2018b). According to Skakni(2018b), “the act of engaging in doctoral studies lies on a set of individuals’ desires, intentions and aspirations, which serve as a driving force oriented toward the future” (p. 200). As such, the doctoral journey presents both facilitating and constraining opportunities that help nourish the quest for self, intellectual quests and professional quest (Skakni, 2018b).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWilf Malcolm Institute of Educational Researchen_NZ
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
dc.titleConceptualising “unexpectedness” during the doctorateen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.15663/wje.v27i2.1002en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfWaikato Journal of Educationen_NZ
pubs.elements-id297376
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.volume27en_NZ


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