Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.authorPatoz, Aurélienen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLussiana, Ten_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBreine, Bastiaanen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorGindre, Cyrilleen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMourot, Laurenten_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHébert-Losier, Kimen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-13T02:59:37Z
dc.date.available2023-02-13T02:59:37Z
dc.date.issued2022-04-15en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/15530
dc.description.abstractRunning biomechanics and ethnicity can influence running economy (RE), which is a critical factor of running performance. Our aim was to compare RE of South East Asian (SEA) and non‑South East Asian (non‑SEA) runners at several endurance running speeds (10–14 km/h) matched for on‑road racing performance and sex. Secondly, we explored anthropometric characteristics and relationships between RE and anthropometric and biomechanical variables. SEA were 6% less economical (p = 0.04) than non‑SEA. SEA were lighter and shorter than non‑SEA, and had lower body mass indexes and leg lengths (p ≤ 0.01). In terms of biomechanics, a higher prevalence of forefoot strikers in SEA than non‑SEA was seen at each speed tested (p ≤ 0.04). Furthermore, SEA had a significantly higher step frequency (p = 0.02), shorter contact time (p = 0.04), smaller footstrike angle (p < 0.001), and less knee extension at toe‑off (p = 0.03) than non‑SEA. Amongst these variables, only mass was positively correlated to RE for both SEA (12 km/h) and non‑SEA (all speeds); step frequency, negatively correlated to RE for both SEA (10 km/h) and non‑SEA (12 km/h); and contact time, positively correlated to RE for SEA (12 km/h). Despite the observed anthropometric and biomechanical differences between cohorts, these data were limited in underpinning the observed RE differences at a group level. This exploratory study provides preliminary indications of potential differences between SEA and non‑SEA runners warranting further consideration. Altogether, these findings suggest caution when generalizing from non‑SEA running studies to SEA runners.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoEnglishen_NZ
dc.publisherNATURE PORTFOLIOen_NZ
dc.rights© 2022. This work is licensed under a CC BY 4.0 license.
dc.subjectScience & Technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectMultidisciplinary Sciencesen_NZ
dc.subjectScience & Technology - Other Topicsen_NZ
dc.subjectJOINT COORDINATE SYSTEMen_NZ
dc.subjectLEG-SPRING BEHAVIORen_NZ
dc.subjectGROUND-CONTACT TIMEen_NZ
dc.subjectSTRIDE FREQUENCYen_NZ
dc.subjectMETABOLIC COSTen_NZ
dc.subjectEXERCISE CAPACITYen_NZ
dc.subjectDISTANCEen_NZ
dc.subjectRUNNERSen_NZ
dc.subjectPERFORMANCEen_NZ
dc.subjectENERGETICSen_NZ
dc.titleNon-South East Asians have a better running economy and different anthropometrics and biomechanics than South East Asiansen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-022-10030-4en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfSCIENTIFIC REPORTSen_NZ
pubs.elements-id269670
pubs.issue1en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume12en_NZ
uow.identifier.article-noARTN 6291


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record