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dc.contributor.authorDerby, Melissaen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2023-11-16T22:19:45Z
dc.date.available2023-11-16T22:19:45Z
dc.date.issued2023-11-16en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/16158
dc.description.abstractThe concept of literacy and its ownership sparks diverse perspectives, with some viewing it through a Western lens of reading and writing, while others argue for a culturally relative understanding encompassing various forms of expression. However, the author contends that broadening the definition recklessly, potentially excluding essential reading and writing skills, may have dire consequences, particularly for marginalized children. The transformative power of traditional literacy (reading and writing) is emphasized, influencing health, economic, civic, and educational outcomes. The author asserts that insistent expansion of literacy definitions risks harming children, urging a steadfast commitment to traditional literacy to ensure equitable opportunities and societal advancement. With extensive research supporting the pivotal role of literacy, the article advocates for a clear stance on what constitutes literacy to prevent the potential neglect of foundational skills for future generations.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urihttps://nzareblog.wordpress.com/2023/11/16/what-literacy-is/en_NZ
dc.rights© 2023 The Author.
dc.titleFailing a Generation: What literacy is and why it mattersen_NZ
dc.typeInternet Publication
dc.relation.isPartOfIpu Kererū Blog of the New Zealand Association for Research in Educationen_NZ
pubs.elements-id330032


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