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dc.contributor.authorNikora, Linda Waimarie
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-03T23:04:37Z
dc.date.available2009-05-03T23:04:37Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationNikora, L. W. (2007). Maori and psychology: Indigenous psychology in New Zealand. In A. Weatherall, M. Wilson, D. Harper & J. McDowall (Eds), Psychology in Aotearoa/ New Zealand (pp. 80-85). Auckland, New Zealand: Pearson Education New Zealand.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/2146
dc.description.abstractMaori have their own approaches to health and well-being, which stem from a world view that values balance, continuity, unity and purpose. The world view is not typically thought of as 'psychology', yet it is a foundation for shared understandings and intelligible action among Maori. Maori behaviours, values, ways of doing things and understandings are often not visible nor valued. However, through these opening years of the twenty-first century, psychologists are slowly turning their attention to addressing this invisibility with the explicit agenda of building 'indigenous psychologies'en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherPearson Education New Zealanden
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the book: Psychology in Aotearoa/ New Zealand. ©2007 Pearson Education New Zealand. Used with Permission.en
dc.subjectMaorien
dc.subjectpsychologyen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.titleMaori and psychology: Indigenous psychology in New Zealanden
dc.typeChapter in Booken
dc.relation.isPartOfPsychology in Aotearoa/New Zealanden_NZ
pubs.begin-page80en_NZ
pubs.elements-id8601
pubs.end-page85en_NZ


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