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dc.contributor.authorDixon, Brian
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-29T03:44:52Z
dc.date.available2009-10-29T03:44:52Z
dc.date.issued1993
dc.identifier.citationDixon, B. (1993). Ethics systems in the New Zealand psychological society. In Nikora, L.W. (Ed.) Cultural Justice and Ethics. Proceedings of a symposium held at the Annual Conference of the New Zealand Psychological Society, University of Victoria, Wellington, 23-24 August 1993. (pp. 21-25).en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/3320
dc.description.abstractIt is important to remember that the Psychological Society does not exist in isolation. It is part of a wider society and must be accountable to and responsive to the needs of the public, its clients and changes occurring in the community. Ethics largely arise out of the public’s expectations of the profession and implied in that is compliance with the law. Psychologists are obviously answerable to the Courts when their actions transgress the law; no one can legally claim that inclusions or omissions from a code of ethics permit them to act outside of the law. Fortunately, there are seldom conflicts between ethical and legal obligations as certain statutory provisions now reflect some of the more important of our ethical standards. Any consideration of ethics in the Society must take account of the wider societal context within which psychologists operate.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherPsychology Department, University of Waikatoen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCultural Justice and Ethics Symposium 1993
dc.rightsCopyright © 1993 National Standing Committee on Bicultural Issuesen
dc.subjectMaorien
dc.subjectpsychologyen
dc.subjectcultural justiceen
dc.subjectethicsen
dc.subjectpsychological societyen
dc.titleEthics systems in the New Zealand psychological societyen
dc.typeConference Contributionen


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