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dc.contributor.authorHansen, Rochelle J.
dc.contributor.authorKamp, Peter J.J.
dc.coverage.spatialConference held at Aucklanden_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-17T02:14:47Z
dc.date.available2010-02-17T02:14:47Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationHansen, R. J. & Kamp, P. J. J. (2004). Rapid progradation of the Pliocene-Pleistocene continental margin, northern Taranaki Basin, New Zealand, and implications. In Proceedings of New Zealand Petroleum Conference 2004, 7-10 March, Crown Minerals, Ministry of Economic Development, Wellington.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/3610
dc.description.abstractProgradation and aggradation of the modern continental margin in northern Taranaki Basin has resulted in the deposition of a thick and rapidly accumulated Pliocene-Pleistocene sedimentary succession. It includes the predominantly muddy Giant Foresets Formation, and the underlying sandy Mangaa Formation. Investigation of the internal attributes and depositional systems associated with the Giant Foresets Formation suggests that it would provide very little effective reservoir for hydrocarbon accumulations, although it does provide essential seal and overburden properties. While the sand-dominated Mangaa Formation could be a hydrocarbon reservoir, drilling so far has yet to reveal any significant hydrocarbon shows. Undoubtedly the most significant contribution that the Giant Foresets and Mangaa Formations have had on petroleum systems in northern Taranaki Basin is the cumulative effect that rapid and substantial accumulation has had on maturation and migration of hydrocarbons in the underlying formations. Palinspastic restoration of a seismic reflection profile across the Northern Graben, together with isopach mapping of stratigraphic section for biostratigraphic stages, indicates that the thickest part of the Pliocene-Pleistocene succession is along the central axis of the Northern Graben. Deposition of this succession contributed substantially to subsidence within the graben, providing further accommodation for sediment accumulation. Isopach and structure contour maps also reveal the extent to which submarine volcanic massifs were exposed along the axis of the graben and the timing of movement on major faults.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherMinistry of Economic Developmenten_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.crownminerals.govt.nz/cms/petroleum/conferences/conference-proceedings-2004en
dc.rightsThis article has been published in Proceedings of New Zealand Petroleum Conference 2004, 7-10 March. © 2004 Hansen, R. J. & P. J. J. Kamp.en
dc.subjectTaranaki Basinen
dc.subjectGiant Foresets Formationen
dc.subjectseismic reflection profileen
dc.subjectPlioceneen
dc.subjectPleistoceneen
dc.titleRapid progradation of the Pliocene-Pleistocene continental margin, northern Taranaki Basin, New Zealand, and implicationsen
dc.typeConference Contributionen
dc.relation.isPartOf2004 New Zealand Petroleum Conferenceen_NZ
pubs.begin-page1en_NZ
pubs.elements-id15274
pubs.end-page9en_NZ
pubs.finish-date2004-03-10en_NZ
pubs.place-of-publicationWellington, New Zealanden_NZ
pubs.start-date2004-03-07en_NZ
pubs.volume2004 New Zealand Petroleum Conference Proceedingsen_NZ


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