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dc.contributor.authorThrupp, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-24T02:35:23Z
dc.date.available2010-05-24T02:35:23Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationThrupp, M. (2007). Education ‘inconvenient truth’: Part one- Persistent middle class advantage. New Zealand Journal of Teacher’s Work, 4(2), 77-88.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/3895
dc.description.abstractAs a policy sociologist I have long been drawn to uncomfortable questions about whose interests are really being served in and through education (Thrupp, 1999a). I’ve been interested in how developments in education policy and practice can lead to greater social inequalities and how seemingly worthwhile policies and practices can be undone by other developments (Thrupp, 1999b). In recent years I’ve also increasingly turned the spotlight back on us as academics and researchers, to consider the politics of our own work and ask awkward questions about whether we are part of the problem too (Thrupp & Willmott, 2003). And, to some extent, I’ve begun to take up that difficult challenge which is always being put to critical scholars, you know, ‘so what’s the alternative?’ (Thrupp, 2005).en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Journal of Teacher's Worken_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.teacherswork.ac.nz/journal/volume4_issue2/thrupp.pdfen
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the journal: New Zealand Journal of Teacher’s Work. Used with permission.en
dc.subjecteducationen
dc.titleEducation ‘inconvenient truth’: Part one- Persistent middle class advantageen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.relation.isPartOfNew Zealand Journal of Teacher's Worken_NZ
pubs.begin-page77en_NZ
pubs.elements-id34915
pubs.end-page88en_NZ
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.volume4en_NZ


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