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dc.contributor.authorPuddick, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorPrinsep, Michèle R.
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-15T04:18:10Z
dc.date.available2010-09-15T04:18:10Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationPuddick, J. & Prinsep, M.R. (2008). MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of Cyanobacteria: a global approach to the discovery of novel secondary metabolites. Chemistry in New Zealand, 72(2), 68-71.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/4576
dc.description.abstractCyanobacteria (blue-green algae) are a group of ancient prokaryotic organisms dating back between three and four billion years.¹ They have been attributed with oxygenating the earth’s atmosphere² but, since the anthropogenic euthrophication of lakes, ponds and oceans, they have become synonymous with water hygiene issues.³ This is due to the alteration of the nutrient composition of their habitat to one which is optimal for growth (or blooms). Cyanobacterial blooms may simply cause foul tastes and odours,⁴ but they can also lead to the production of toxic secondary metabolites poisonous to humans and animals upon ingestion.⁵ NZ has yet to suffer a human fatality, but the deaths of several dogs in Wellington was attributed to homoanatoxin-a 1 (Chart 1) from a Phormidium species.⁶en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Institute of Chemistry
dc.relation.urihttp://nzic.org.nz/CiNZ/articles/Princep_72_2.pdfen_NZ
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the journal: Chemistry in New Zealand. Used with permission.en_NZ
dc.subjectchemistryen_NZ
dc.titleMALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of Cyanobacteria: a global approach to the discovery of novel secondary metabolitesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ


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