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dc.contributor.authorColl, Richard K.
dc.contributor.authorLay, Mark C.
dc.contributor.authorMark C., Neil
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-15T04:50:40Z
dc.date.available2010-09-15T04:50:40Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationColl, R.K., Lay, M.C. & Taylor, N. (2006). Investigating scientific literacy: Scientist’s habits of mind as evidenced by their rationale of science and religious beliefs. Chemistry in New Zealand, 70(2), 34-41.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/4579
dc.description.abstractScience and technology have been incredibly success¬ful in purely technical terms. For instance, international air travel, space flight, and curing of hitherto untreatable medical illnesses all are now routine events. One feature of the incredible (and seemingly ever increasing) advance of science and technology is a sense of unease amongst the general population of science’s potential to change our lives, in sometimes unpredictable and alarming ways. Public understanding of science, or scientific literacy, is of increasing concern worldwide according to much recent literature.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Institute of Chemistryen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://nzic.org.nz/CiNZ/articles/Coll_70_2.pdfen_NZ
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the journal: Chemistry in New Zealand. Used with permission.en_NZ
dc.subjectscienceen_NZ
dc.titleInvestigating scientific literacy: Scientist’s habits of mind as evidenced by their rationale of science and religious beliefsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfChemistry in New Zealanden_NZ
pubs.begin-page34en_NZ
pubs.elements-id35307
pubs.end-page41en_NZ
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.volume70en_NZ


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