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dc.contributor.authorLowe, David J.
dc.contributor.authorMcDaniel, Paul
dc.coverage.spatialConference held at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-09T02:50:47Z
dc.date.available2011-05-09T02:50:47Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationLowe, D.J. & McDaniel, P. (2008). Impacts of deforestation and burning, and the role of bracken fern, on the properties of surficial or buried soil A-horizons. In D.J. Lowe (Ed.), Guidebook for Pre-conference North Island Field Trip A1 “Ashes and Issues”, 28-30 November, 2008. Australian and New Zealand 4th Joint Soils Conference, Massey University, Palmerston North. New Zealand Society of Soil Science, Christchurch. (pp.154-158). Palmerston North, New Zealand: New Zealand Society of Soil Science.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/5319
dc.description.abstractBracken fern (Pteridium spp.) is an aggressive plant that commonly invades disturbed sites. Its success as an invader is attributable, in part, to its ability to produce abundant growth, both below ground in the form of rhizomes and fine roots and above ground as fronds and stems. This biomass production has been shown to affect numerous soil properties. In describing soils of the „Pumice Lands‟ (Pumice Soils or Vitrands mainly) in New Zealand, Molloy and Christie (1998) attributed black A horizons „to bracken fern, which replaced much of the forest‟. Analyses of humus and phytoliths in the A horizons of soils developed especially on Kaharoa and Taupo tephras in central North Island (buried beneath 1886 Tarawera eruptives in the Rerewhakaaitu area) showed that type-A humic acids predominated and that fernland and grassland had replaced the pre-existing forests (Birrell et al., 1971; Sase et al., 1988; Hosono et al., 1991; Sase and Hosono, 1996). Pollen, phytolith and associated studies, together with tephrochronology, have shown that human-induced deforestation by burning began in New Zealand soon after Polynesian settlers arrived (e.g. McGlone, 1989; Clarkson et al., 1992; Kondo et al., 1994; McGlone et al., 1994; Newnham et al., 1998; McGlone and Wilmshurst, 1999; Watanabe and Sakagami, 1999; see also article on Polynesian settlement by Lowe, this volume). The repeated burning resulted in the formation of extensive fernlands (McGlone et al., 2005).en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Society of Soil Scienceen_NZ
dc.rightsThis article has been published in “Guidebook for Pre-conference North Island Field Trip A1 “Ashes and Issues”, 28-30 November, 2008”. Used with permission.en_NZ
dc.subjectbracken fernen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.titleImpacts of deforestation and burning, and the role of bracken fern, on the properties of surficial or buried soil A-horizonsen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contributionen_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfSoils 2008 Australian and New Zealand 4th Joint Soils Conferenceen_NZ
pubs.begin-page154en_NZ
pubs.elements-id18275
pubs.end-page158en_NZ
pubs.finish-date2008-12-05en_NZ
pubs.start-date2008-12-01en_NZ
pubs.volumeGuidebook for Pre-conference North Island Field Trip 'Ashes and Issues' - 28-30 November 2008en_NZ


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