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dc.contributor.authorColl, Richard K.
dc.contributor.authorEames, Chris W.
dc.contributor.authorPaku, Levinia K.
dc.contributor.authorLay, Mark C.
dc.contributor.authorHodges, Dave
dc.contributor.authorBhat, Ravi
dc.contributor.authorRam, Shiu
dc.contributor.authorAyling, Diana
dc.contributor.authorFleming, Jenny
dc.contributor.authorFerkins, Lesley
dc.contributor.authorWiersma, Cindy
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-08T04:01:05Z
dc.date.available2011-08-08T04:01:05Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationColl, R., Eames, C., Paku, L.K., Lay, M., Hodges, D., …, Martin, A. (2011). An exploration of the pedagogies employed to integrate knowledge in work-integrated learning. The Journal of Cooperative Education and Internships, 43, 14-35.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/5554
dc.description.abstractThis article describes a three‐sector, national research project that investigated the integration aspect of work‐integrated learning (WIL). The context for this study is three sectors of New Zealand higher education: business and management, sport, and science and engineering, and a cohort of higher educational institutions that offer WIL/cooperative education in variety of ways. The aims of this study were to investigate the pedagogical approaches in WIL programs that are currently used by WIL practitioners in terms of learning, and the integration of academic‐workplace learning. The research constituted a series of collective case studies, and there were two main data sources — interviews with three stakeholder groups (namely employers, students, and co‐op practitioners), and analyses of relevant documentation (e.g., course/paper outlines, assignments on reflective practice, portfolio of learning, etc.). The research findings suggest that there is no consistent mechanism by which placement coordinators, off‐campus supervisors, or mentors seek to employ or develop pedagogies to foster learning and the integration of knowledge. Learning, it seems, occurs by means of legitimate peripheral participation with off‐campus learning occurring as a result of students working alongside professionals in their area via an apprenticeship model of learning. There is no evidence of explicit attempts to integrate on‐ and off‐campus learning, although all parties felt this would and should occur. However, integration is implicitly or indirectly fostered by a variety of means such as the use of reflective journals.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCooperative Education and Internship Association, Inc.en_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.ceiainc.org/journal.asp?PageID=214en_NZ
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the journal: The Journal of Cooperative Education and Internships. Used with permission.en_NZ
dc.subjectpostsecondaryen_NZ
dc.subjectbusiness and managementen_NZ
dc.subjectsporten_NZ
dc.subjectscience and engineeringen_NZ
dc.subjectintegrationen_NZ
dc.subjectreflective practiceen_NZ
dc.titleAn exploration of the pedagogies employed to integrate knowledge in work-integrated learningen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfThe Journal of Cooperative Education and Internshipsen_NZ
pubs.begin-page14en_NZ
pubs.elements-id34197
pubs.end-page35en_NZ
pubs.volume43en_NZ


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