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dc.contributor.authorAllentoft, Morten E.
dc.contributor.authorRawlence, Nicolas J.
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-27T03:19:01Z
dc.date.available2012-01-27T03:19:01Z
dc.date.issued2012-01
dc.identifier.citationAllentoft, M.E. & Rawlence, N.J. (2012). Moa's Ark or volant ghosts of Gondwana? Insights from nineteen years of ancient DNA research on the extinct moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) of New Zealand. Annals of Anatomy-Anatomischer Anzeiger, 194(1), 36-51.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/5990
dc.description.abstractThe moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) of New Zealand represent one of the extinct iconic taxa that define the field of ancient DNA (aDNA), and after almost two decades of genetic scrutiny of bones, feathers, coprolites, mummified tissue, eggshell, and sediments, our knowledge of these prehistoric giants has increased significantly. Thanks to molecular and morphological-based research, the insights that have been obtained into moa phylogenetics, phylogeography, and palaeobiology exceeds that of any other extinct taxon. This review documents the strengths of applying a multidisciplinary approach when studying extinct taxa but also shows that cross-disciplinary controversies still remain at the most fundamental levels, with highly conflicting interpretations derived from aDNA and morphology. Moa species diversity, for example, is still heavily debated, as well as their relationship with other ratites and the mode of radiation. In addition to increasing our knowledge on a lineage of extinct birds, further insights into these aspects can clarify some of the basal splits in avian evolution, and the evolutionary implications of the breakup of the prehistoric supercontinent Gondwana. Did a flightless moa ancestor drift away on proto New Zealand (Moa's Ark) or did a volant ancestor arrive by flight? Here we provide an overview of 19years of aDNA research on moa, critically assess the attempts and controversies in placing the moa lineage among palaeognath birds, and discuss the factors that facilitated the extensive radiation of moa. Finally, we identify the most obvious gaps in the current knowledge to address the future potential research areas in moa genetics.en_NZ
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevieren_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0940960211000823en_NZ
dc.subjectAncientDNAen_NZ
dc.subjectMoaen_NZ
dc.subjectDinornithiformesen_NZ
dc.subjectratite evolutionen_NZ
dc.subjectvicarianceen_NZ
dc.subjectpalaeognathen_NZ
dc.subjectmolecular clocksen_NZ
dc.titleMoa's Ark or volant ghosts of Gondwana? Insights from nineteen years of ancient DNA research on the extinct moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) of New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.aanat.2011.04.002en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfAnnals of Anatomyen_NZ
pubs.begin-page36en_NZ
pubs.elements-id35895
pubs.end-page51en_NZ
pubs.issue1en_NZ
pubs.volume194en_NZ


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