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dc.contributor.authorMiddleton, Sue
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-27T04:37:17Z
dc.date.available2012-04-27T04:37:17Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationMiddleton, S. (2002). A thesis in the house: family matters. Waikato Journal of Education, 8, 137-150.en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1173-6135
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/6263
dc.description.abstractThis paper is taken from a wider study of the experience of researching and writing a thesis. My interviews with 57 PhD graduates in Education included many accounts of how women and men managed their time and organised space. Where, and when, do thesis students read, think, and write? They spoke of struggles to `make time', `clear space,' or `create a private place.' How did they reconcile the spatial, temporal, and relational demands - simultaneous and competing - of thesis research and domestic life? How did they handle the physical and emotional stresses of `mapping' the thesis into their everyday lives? The interface between domestic life and intellectual production is an issue that has received little attention in educational scholarship. I draw on geographical, as well as educational, theorists to Upproach this question.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherFaculty of Education, University of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.wje.org.nz/index.phpen_NZ
dc.rights© 2002 Waikato Journal of Education. It is posted here by permission for personal use.en_NZ
dc.subjectacademic dissertationsen_NZ
dc.subjectdoctor of education degreeen_NZ
dc.subjectteacher educatorsen_NZ
dc.subjectinterviewsen_NZ
dc.subjectscholarshipsen_NZ
dc.subjecteducationen_NZ
dc.titleA thesis in the house: family matters.en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfWaikato Journal of Educationen_NZ
pubs.begin-page137en_NZ
pubs.elements-id27887
pubs.end-page150en_NZ
pubs.volume8en_NZ


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