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dc.contributor.authorCherrington, Lisa
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T04:40:10Z
dc.date.available2008-06-12T04:40:10Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationCherrington, L. (2003). The use of Māori mythology in clinical settings: Training issues and needs. In Nikora, L.W., Levy, M., Masters, B., Waitoki, W., Te Awekotuku, N., and Etheredge, R.J.M. (Eds). (2003). The Proceedings of the National Māori Graduates of Psychology Symposium 2002: Making a difference. Proceedings of a symposium hosted by the Māori & Psychology Research Unit at the University of Waikato, Hamilton, 29-30 November 2002 (pp.117-120). Hamilton, New Zealand: Māori and Psychology Research Unit, University of Waikato.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/848
dc.description.abstractWithin therapeutic settings, narrative approaches are increasingly being used as a way of creating new understandings and new stories. This paper discusses the use of purakau as a Māori focused intervention when working with Māori tangata whaiora (clients) and their whānau. This paper will outline the rationale and relevance of using purakau with Māori. However, the emphasis is on the training provided to clinicians in the use of purakau. An outline of the training process is provided. In doing so, issues regarding the use of these taonga (treasures) in clinical psychology will be raised. It will be argued that Māori mythology must have a place in the kete of Māori psychology.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherMaori and Psychology Research Unit, University of Waikatoen_US
dc.subjectMaorien_US
dc.subjectpsychologyen_US
dc.subjectcultural approachesen_US
dc.subjectnarrative approachesen_US
dc.subjectmythologyen_US
dc.titleThe use of Māori mythology in clinical settings: Training issues and needsen_US
dc.typeConference Contributionen_US


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