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dc.contributor.authorHuang, Yu-Tuan
dc.contributor.authorLowe, David J.
dc.contributor.authorChurchman, G. Jock
dc.contributor.authorSchipper, Louis A.
dc.contributor.authorRawlence, Nicolas J.
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Alan
dc.contributor.editorHartemink, Alfred E.
dc.contributor.editorMcSweeney, Kevin
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-12T03:00:15Z
dc.date.available2014
dc.date.available2015-01-12T03:00:15Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationHuang, Y.-T., Lowe, D. J., Churchman, G. J., Schipper, L. A., Rawlence, N. J., & Cooper, A. (2014). Carbon storage and DNA absorption in allophanic soils and paleosols. In A. E. Hartemink & K. McSweeney (Eds.), Progress in Soil Science Series (pp. 163–172). New York, USA: Springer, New York. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-04084-4_17en
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-04083-7
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/9045
dc.description.abstractAndisols and andic paleosols dominated by the nanocrystalline mineral allophane sequester large amounts of carbon (C), attributable mainly to its chemical bonding with charged hydroxyl groups on the surface of allophane together with its physical protection in nanopores within and between allophane nanoaggregates. C near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra for a New Zealand Andisol (Tirau series) showed that the organic matter (OM) mainly comprises quinonic, aromatic, aliphatic, and carboxylic C. In different buried horizons from several other Andisols, C contents varied but the C species were similar, attributable to pedogenic processes operating during developmental upbuilding, downward leaching, or both. The presence of OM in natural allophanic soils weakened the adsorption of DNA on clay; an adsorption isotherm experiment involving humic acid (HA) showed that HA-free synthetic allophane adsorbed seven times more DNA than HA-rich synthetic allophane. Phosphorus X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra for salmonsperm DNA and DNA-clay complexes indicated that DNA was bound to the allophane clay through the phosphate group, but it is not clear if DNA was chemically bound to the surface of the allophane or to OM, or both. We plan more experiments to investigate interactions among DNA, allophane (natural and synthetic), and OM. Because DNA shows a high affinity to allophane, we are studying the potential to reconstruct late Quaternary palaeoenvironments by attempting to extract and characterise ancient DNA from allophanic paleosols
dc.format.extent163 - 172 (10)
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer, New York
dc.subjectAndisols
dc.subjectallophane
dc.subjectcarbon sequestration
dc.subjectC NEXAFS
dc.subjectP XANES
dc.subjectancient DNA
dc.titleCarbon storage and DNA absorption in allophanic soils and paleosols
dc.typeChapter in Book
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-04084-4_17
dc.relation.isPartOfSoil Carbon
dc.relation.isPartOfProgress in Soil Science Series
pubs.begin-page163
pubs.elements-id81823
pubs.end-page172
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/FSEN
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/FSEN/School of Science
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/FSEN/School of Science/Earth & Ocean Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/Staff
pubs.place-of-publicationNew York, USA


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