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dc.contributor.authorArcher, Stephen David Jamesen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Ian R.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHerbold, Craig W.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLee, Charles Kai-Wuen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCary, S. Craigen_NZ
dc.coverage.spatialSwitzerlanden_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-18T04:59:56Z
dc.date.available2015en_NZ
dc.date.available2015-06-18T04:59:56Z
dc.date.issued2015en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationArcher, S. D. J., McDonald, I. R., Herbold, C. W., Lee, C. K., & Cary, S. C. (2015). Benthic microbial communities of coastal terrestrial and ice shelf Antarctic meltwater ponds. Front Microbiol, 6, article 485. http://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2015.00485en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/9424
dc.description.abstractThe numerous perennial meltwater ponds distributed throughout Antarctica represent diverse and productive ecosystems central to the ecological functioning of the surrounding ultra oligotrophic environment. The dominant taxa in the pond benthic communities have been well described however, little is known regarding their regional dispersal and local drivers to community structure. The benthic microbial communities of 12 meltwater ponds in the McMurdo Sound of Antarctica were investigated to examine variation between pond microbial communities and their biogeography. Geochemically comparable but geomorphologically distinct ponds were selected from Bratina Island (ice shelf) and Miers Valley (terrestrial) (<40 km between study sites), and community structure within ponds was compared using DNA fingerprinting and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. More than 85% of total sequence reads were shared between pooled benthic communities at different locations (OTU0.05), which in combination with favorable prevailing winds suggests aeolian regional distribution. Consistent with previous findings Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla representing over 50% of total sequences; however, a large number of other phyla (21) were also detected in this ecosystem. Although dominant Bacteria were ubiquitous between ponds, site and local selection resulted in heterogeneous community structures and with more than 45% of diversity being pond specific. Potassium was identified as the most significant contributing factor to the cosmopolitan community structure and aluminum to the location unique community based on a BEST analysis (Spearman's correlation coefficient of 0.632 and 0.806, respectively). These results indicate that the microbial communities in meltwater ponds are easily dispersed regionally and that the local geochemical environment drives the ponds community structure.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherFrontiersen_NZ
dc.rights© 2015 Archer, McDonald, Herbold, Lee and Cary. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).
dc.subjectAntarcticen_NZ
dc.subjectbenthicen_NZ
dc.subjectbiogeographyen_NZ
dc.subjectmicrobialen_NZ
dc.subjectponden_NZ
dc.titleBenthic microbial communities of coastal terrestrial and ice shelf Antarctic meltwater ponds.en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmicb.2015.00485en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfFront Microbiolen_NZ
pubs.begin-page485en_NZ
pubs.elements-id121360
pubs.issueMAYen_NZ
pubs.volume6en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn1664-302Xen_NZ
uow.identifier.article-noARTN 485en_NZ


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