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dc.contributor.authorPannewitz, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorGreen, T.G. Allan
dc.contributor.authorMaysek, Kadmiel
dc.contributor.authorSchlensog, Mark
dc.contributor.authorSeppelt, Rodney D.
dc.contributor.authorSancho, Leopoldo G.
dc.contributor.authorTürk, Roman
dc.contributor.authorSchroeter, Burkhard
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-18T02:47:52Z
dc.date.available2008-08-18T02:47:52Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationPannewitz, S., Green, T.G.A., Maysek, K., Schlensog, M., Seppelt, R., Sancho, L. G., Türk, R. & Schroeter, B. (2005). Photosynthetic responses of three common mosses from continental Antarctica. Antarctic Science, 17(03), 341-352.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0954-1020
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/954
dc.description.abstractPredicting the effects of climate change on Antarctic terrestrial vegetation requires a better knowledge of the ecophysiology of common moss species. In this paper we provide a comprehensive matrix for photosynthesis and major environmental parameters for three dominant Antarctic moss species (Bryum subrotundifolium, B. pseudotriquetrum and Ceratodon purpureus). Using locations in southern Victoria Land, (Granite Harbour, 77°S) and northern Victoria Land (Cape Hallett, 72°S) we determined the responses of net photosynthesis and dark respiration to thallus water content, thallus temperature, photosynthetic photon flux densities and CO2 concentration over several summer seasons. The studies also included microclimate recordings at all sites where the research was carried out in field laboratories. Plant temperature was influenced predominantly by the water regime at the site with dry mosses being warmer. Optimal temperatures for net photosynthesis were 13.7°C, 12.0°C and 6.6°C for B. subrotundifolium, B. pseudotriquetrum and C. purpureus, respectively and fall within the known range for Antarctic mosses. Maximal net photosynthesis at 10°C ranked as B. subrotundifolium > B. pseudotriquetrum > C. purpureus. Net photosynthesis was strongly depressed at subzero temperatures but was substantial at 0°C. Net photosynthesis of the mosses was not saturated by light at optimal water content and thallus temperature. Response of net photosynthesis to increase in water content was as expected for mosses although B. subrotundifolium showed a large depression (60%) at the highest hydrations. Net photosynthesis of both B. subrotundifolium and B. pseudotriquetrum showed a large response to increase in CO2 concentration and this rose with increase in temperature; saturation was not reached for B. pseudotriquetrum at 20°C. There was a high level of variability for species at the same sites in different years and between different locations. This was substantial enough to make prediction of the effects of climate change very difficult at the moment.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ANSen_US
dc.rightsThis article is published in the journal, Antarctic Science. Copyright © Antarctic Science Ltd 2006.en_US
dc.subjectbryophytesen_US
dc.subjectgobal changeen_US
dc.subjectlight compensationen_US
dc.subjectmicroclimateen_US
dc.subjectnet photosynthesisen_US
dc.subjectVictoria Landen_US
dc.titlePhotosynthetic responses of three common mosses from continental Antarcticaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0954102005002774en_US
dc.relation.isPartOfAntarctic Scienceen_NZ
pubs.begin-page341en_NZ
pubs.editionSeptemberen_NZ
pubs.elements-id31828
pubs.end-page352en_NZ
pubs.issue3en_NZ
pubs.volume17en_NZ


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