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dc.contributor.authorAtkins, Martin Johnen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWalmsley, Michael R.W.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWalmsley, Timothy Gordonen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorNeale, James R.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-01T02:44:24Z
dc.date.available2015-08-27en_NZ
dc.date.available2015-10-01T02:44:24Z
dc.date.issued2015-08-27en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationAtkins, M. J., Walmsley, M. R. W., Walmsley, T. G., & Neale, J. R. (2015). Integration of Biomass Conversion Technologies and Geothermal Heat into a Model Wood Processing Cluster. Chemical Engineering Transactions, 45, 169–174. http://doi.org/10.3303/CET1545029en
dc.identifier.isbn978-88-95608-36-5en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn2283-9216en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/9670
dc.description.abstractDue to the anticipated future demand for bio-derived fuels and chemicals it is important to identify which processes would benefit from integration with existing industrial clusters, especially those producing wood based products such as pulp and paper. Specific integration schemes need to be identified and benefits, both economic and environmental, quantified to assist the successful commercialisation and adoption of these new technologies. These synergies are examples of industrial symbiosis; the sharing of resources, including utilities and services between different co-located production facilities. Total site analysis is an important tool to accomplish this task. A model of a typical wood processing cluster including a thermo-mechanical pulp and paper mill, kraft pulp and paper mill, and saw mill have been used to evaluate the integration potential of possible new entrants into the cluster. A background/foreground analysis was used to assess any heat recovery potential between the cluster and the new entrant. Some of the processes considered had little or no integration potential due to having approximately the same pinch temperature as the cluster. Large potential was found to occur where the pinch temperatures were dissimilar and the shape of the grand composite curves complimentary. The integration of geothermal heat as a means of generating surplus black liquor as a feed to a biorefinery process was also examined.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAIDICen_NZ
dc.rightsCopyright © 2015, AIDIC Servizi S.r.l.. Used with permission.
dc.titleIntegration of Biomass Conversion Technologies and Geothermal Heat into a Model Wood Processing Clusteren_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3303/CET1545029en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfChemical Engineering Transactionsen_NZ
pubs.begin-page169
pubs.elements-id130284
pubs.end-page174
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume45en_NZ


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