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Sustainable management of surfing breaks: case studies and recommendations

Abstract
In a detailed analysis, Small and Nicholls (2003) found that the coastal population is approximately three times the global average and that it is commonly believed that coastal migration is continuing and growing. Lazarow (2007) estimates that 86% of Australians live within 30 minutes of the coast, while in small island nations the entire population is coastal. Development to support growing coastal populations puts pressure on many resources, including the natural features that create surfing waves (e.g., Anonymous, 2003; Lazarow, 2007; Mead et al., 2007; Pratte, 1987). It is asserted by this paper that the features that form a surfing break are a resource that possesses recreational amenity values. Surfing breaks need protection as these amenity values are important resources for coastal communities, both socially and economically (Lazarow, 2007; Lazarow, Miller, and Blackwell, 2007a, 2007b; Nelsen, Pendleton, and Vaughn, 2007). Some environmental legislation, e.g., New Zealand’s Resource Management Act (1991, Section 7c) already requires the protection and maintenance of these recreational amenity values.
Type
Journal Article
Type of thesis
Series
Citation
Scarfe, B. E., Healy, T. R., Rennie, H. G. & Mead, S. T. (2009). Sustainable management of surfing breaks: case studies and recommendations. Journal of Coastal Research, 25(3), 684-703.
Date
2009
Publisher
Coastal Education & Research Foundation, Inc
Degree
Supervisors
Rights