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dc.contributor.authorWeijers, Dan M.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-13T22:20:04Z
dc.date.available2017en_NZ
dc.date.available2017-07-13T22:20:04Z
dc.date.issued2017en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationWeijers, D. M. (2017). Does increasing national happiness require decreasing freedom or determining social values? Presented at the Quality of Life Research Symposium: An Interdisciplinary Discussion, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand, May 26, 2017.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/11184
dc.description.abstractSome academics and policymakers have argued that happiness (or subjective well‐being) should be used as a goal for public policy. An important criticism of policy‐based attempts to increase happiness is that they will decrease the options for citizens to pursue their own version of the good life. I will argue that the pursuit of any reasonable policy goals necessarily involves some restrictions on freedom and some determining of social values. I will also argue that a comparison of the plausible goals for public policy reveals that happiness is no more a threat to freedom and reasonable pluralism about the good life than other plausible policy goals.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urihttp://www.danweijers.com/ppt/Does_increasing_national_happiness_require_decreasing_freedom_or_determining_social_values.pptx
dc.rights© 2017 the author
dc.sourceQuality of Life Research Symposium: An Interdisciplinary Discussion, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.titleDoes increasing national happiness require decreasing freedom or determining social values?en_NZ
pubs.elements-id195014
pubs.finish-date2017-05-26en_NZ
pubs.start-date2017-05-26en_NZ


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