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dc.contributor.authorWallace, Philippa Janeen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Rossen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Iainen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-29T21:56:12Z
dc.date.available2017en_NZ
dc.date.available2017-08-29T21:56:12Z
dc.date.issued2017en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationWallace, P. J., Martin, R., & White, I. (2017). Keeping pace with technology: drones, disturbance and policy deficiency. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, -online. https://doi.org/10.1080/09640568.2017.1353957en
dc.identifier.issn0964-0568en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/11292
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyses regulatory responses to rapid intensification of the use of drones/remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) in the context of wildlife protection. Benefits and disadvantages of the technology to wildlife are examined, before three key limitations in policy and law are identified: failure to address wildlife disturbance in RPA regulation; reliance upon insufficiently comprehensive existing wildlife protection legislation to manage disturbance effects; and limited species-specific research on disturbance. A New Zealand case study further reveals an inconsistent regulatory approach struggling to keep pace with innovation, inadequate regulatory capture of environmental effects due to exemption as “aircraft”, and no recognition that specific geographical locations, such as coastal areas, distinguished by recreational pressures and high numbers of threatened species require special consideration. Recommendations include acknowledging the impact on wildlife in policy, gap analysis of legal arrangements for protection from disturbance (including airspace), and adoption of minimum approach distances to threatened species.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Groupen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1080/09640568.2017.1353957
dc.rightsThis is an author’s submitted version of an article published in the journal: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management. © 2017 Newcastle University.
dc.subjectUAVen_NZ
dc.subjectRPAen_NZ
dc.subjectdroneen_NZ
dc.subjectaircraften_NZ
dc.subjectregulationen_NZ
dc.subjectwildlife conflicten_NZ
dc.subjectwildlife disturbanceen_NZ
dc.titleKeeping pace with technology: drones, disturbance and policy deficiencyen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09640568.2017.1353957en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Environmental Planning and Managementen_NZ
pubs.elements-id201581
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/2018 PBRF
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/FASS
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/FASS/2018 PBRF - FASS
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/FASS/School of Social Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/FASS/School of Social Sciences/Environmental Planning
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_NZ
pubs.volume-onlineen_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn1360-0559en_NZ


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