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dc.contributor.authorBrabyn, Larsen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T01:17:44Z
dc.date.available2017en_NZ
dc.date.available2017-10-18T01:17:44Z
dc.date.issued2017en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationBrabyn, L. (2017). Declining towns and rapidly growing cities in New Zealand: developing an empirically-based model that can inform policy. Policy Quarterly, 13(Supplementary), 37–46.en
dc.identifier.issn2324-1098en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/11409
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding and predicting spatial patterns in population change has significant implications for infrastructure, property investments, and national spatial planning. It is also at the core of understanding what motivates people to move to different places, and the underlying geographical conditions that are important to people. During recent times, the population growth of large cities in New Zealand (particularly Auckland, but Tauranga has had faster growth) has resulted in severe social and infrastructural problems, such as sky-rocketing house prices, homelessness, and congestion of roads. At the same time, many small towns have had significant population decline, with no proposed solutions apart from acceptance or undertaking so-called “managed decline” (McMillan 2016; Wood 2017). As will be described in this article, net migration has been a significant component of the spatial variation in population change, while natural change does not have a significant spatial variation and has been generally positive for all urban places. A policy response to the spatial variation of net migration needs to be based on an empirically based understanding of what drives net migration.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherInstitute for Governance and Policy Studies, School of Government at Victoria University of Wellingtonen_NZ
dc.rightsThis article is published in the Policy Quarterly. ©2017 Policy Quarterly. Used with permission.
dc.titleDeclining towns and rapidly growing cities in New Zealand: developing an empirically-based model that can inform policyen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.relation.isPartOfPolicy Quarterlyen_NZ
pubs.begin-page37
pubs.elements-id194628
pubs.end-page46
pubs.issueSupplementaryen_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume13en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn2324-1101en_NZ


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