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dc.contributor.authorMorad, Munir
dc.contributor.authorJay, Grace Mairi M.
dc.contributor.authorArmitage, R.
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-23T20:17:43Z
dc.date.available2008-10-23T20:17:43Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationMorad, M., Jay, M. & Armitage, R. (2004). Managing soil biodiversity: The New Zealand experience. SEESOIL, 15, 87-95.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/1148
dc.description.abstractSpecies diversity is a very important component of a healthy soil ecosystem, and a necessary condition for long-term sustainable development. However, it is widely recognised that soil degradation and species extinction are on the increase in New Zealand, as land resources come under pressure from urban expansion and modern agribusiness. New Zealand's soils, flora and fauna have evolved many unique elements during their long isolation from other land masses. Habitat destruction and introduced plants and animals have, therefore, had increasingly detrimental effects on indigenous biodiversity. New Zealand must conserve what remains.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSouth East England soils discussion groupen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.soils.org.uk/seEngland.htmen_US
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the journal: SEESOILen_US
dc.subjectSoil biodiversityen_US
dc.titleManaging soil biodiversity: The New Zealand experienceen_US
dc.relation.isPartOfSEESOIL: Journal of the South East England soils discussion groupen_NZ
pubs.begin-page87en_NZ
pubs.elements-id31107
pubs.end-page95en_NZ
pubs.volume15en_NZ


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