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dc.contributor.advisorYoung-Loveridge, Jennifer
dc.contributor.advisorRitchie, Garth
dc.contributor.advisorTunmer, Bill
dc.contributor.advisorCornish, Ian
dc.contributor.authorBlaiklock, Kenneth E.
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-12T20:38:47Z
dc.date.available2019-08-12T20:38:47Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.identifier.citationBlaiklock, K. E. (1999). Phonological awareness and alphabet knowledge in the acquisition of literacy skills (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/12776en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12776
dc.description.abstractThe nature of the relationship between phonological awareness and the acquisition of literacy was investigated in a longitudinal study of 29 children during their first two years at school. At the beginning of the study, when all children were nonreaders, syllable awareness was the strongest predictor of later word reading and spelling. During the first year, correlations from rhyme or alliteration awareness to later literacy were significant over intervals of two or three months. Correlations in the other direction, that is, from literacy to later rhyme or alliteration awareness were also significant over these periods. These results support the notion that early awareness of syllables, rhyme, and alliteration has a small facilitative effect on the first months of learning to read and spell, after which time a reciprocal relationship develops. Children were unable to score on both measures of phoneme awareness until after they could read a number of words. From half way through the first year, significant correlations were often found from phoneme awareness to later literacy. Correlations in the other direction, that is, from literacy to later phoneme awareness, were also significant. These results are consistent with phoneme awareness initially being a consequence of learning to read and write, and then having a reciprocal relationship with literacy. Controlling for verbal ability or phonological memory made little difference to the size of the correlations between measures of phonological awareness and literacy. Controlling for letter knowledge, however, often resulted in substantial reductions in the size of the correlations. Letter knowledge was frequently a strong predictor of later literacy. It is argued that letter knowledge has a central role in the development of literacy skills and in the relationship between phonological awareness and literacy.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectEnglish language Acquisition
dc.subjectEnglish language Phonology
dc.subjectEnglish language Alphabet
dc.subjectLanguage awareness in children
dc.subjectLanguage arts (Elementary)
dc.titlePhonological awareness and alphabet knowledge in the acquisition of literacy skills
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.updated2019-08-12T20:35:52Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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