Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.advisorSutton, Anna
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-13T00:47:50Z
dc.date.available2020-03-13T00:47:50Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationRobinson, C. (2020). EPM effects on workplace well-being: The role of personality (Thesis, Master of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/13508en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/13508
dc.description.abstractWithin the workplace, electronic performance monitoring (EPM) is an electronically integrated system used to assess employee behaviours and ultimately performance. Previous research indicates EPM is associated with various negative psychosocial effects due to job roles being inherently changed with the use of these systems. However, research has yet to explore whether an individual's characteristics can also be attributable for influencing these outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this research was to investigate whether personality factors could moderate or mediate the negative effects of electronic performance monitoring. Using a quantitative survey methodology this project acquired 112 participants to assess the relationship between the amount of EPM they were exposed to and the levels of trust in senior management, affective commitment and self-perceived stress. The participants also completed the Conscientiousness and Emotional Stability scales from the Five Factor of Personality and a shortened version of Rotter’s Locus of Control. Regressional, Moderation, mediation and MANCOVA analysis were conducted to assess whether the personality factors held moderating or mediating attributes. The findings indicated that greater amounts of EPM did not predict lower levels of trust, commitment or an increase in stress. Furthermore, the Conscientiousness personality factor held no bearing on the negative effects of EPM, whereas Emotional Stability moderated the effects of trust and modestly meditated commitment and stress. The Locus of Control was also found to have influenced employees’ levels of trust. The current findings suggest the use of electronic performance monitoring does not radically change the job design to a degree where employees experience a decline in well being at work. However, whether the organisation's intention to use EPM is for supportive or punitive purposes is likely to have been a pivotal factor in how the systems are perceived. This highlights the need for policies and clear communication detailing why the information will be collected and how it will be used. In addition, some personality factors were found to modest factors contributing negative effects of EPM. In practice, this finding suggests occupations requiring intensive monitoring may be more appropriate for those with greater levels of emotional stability and who possess an internal Locus of Control.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.titleEPM effects on workplace well-being: The role of personality
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)
dc.date.updated2020-03-11T07:25:35Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record