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dc.contributor.authorO'Hare, Paulen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Iainen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-27T23:54:04Z
dc.date.available2020-09-27T23:54:04Z
dc.date.issued2018en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationO’Hare, P., & White, I. (2018). Beyond ‘just’ flood risk management: the potential for-and limits to-alleviating flood disadvantage. Region Environmental Change, 18(2), 385–396. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10113-017-1216-3en
dc.identifier.issn1436-3798en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/13851
dc.description.abstractThe threat of flooding poses a considerable challenge for justice. Not only are more citizens becoming exposed to risk, but they are expected to play increasingly active roles in flood risk management. However, until recently, few efforts have charted broader understandings of disadvantage relating to flood risk exposure. Drawing upon social science scholarship that has long been sensitive to concerns related to justice, we deploy and develop the notion of flood disadvantage as a means to assess the challenges to more ‘just’ flood risk management. We contend that the concept of flood disadvantage offers a useful lens to appreciate the constraints of technical approaches to flood risk management, in particular, its limited ability to incorporate complex social elements such as how individuals have differing vulnerabilities and sensitivities to flooding and uneven abilities to engage with risk agendas. The notion highlights the compounding interactions between flooding and other social disadvantages across multiple public policy areas and scales. We argue a fuller acknowledgement of the socio-spatial-temporal dimensions of intersecting disadvantages can help sensitise technical risk analyses that tend to see people and communities as homogeneous entities in a given spatiality. In doing so we can better reveal why some individuals or communities are more vulnerable to disasters or are slower to recover than others. Finally, we outline the challenges in turning more ‘just’ flood risk management from an abstract notion into one that could inform future practice.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherSpringeren_NZ
dc.rightsThis is a pre-print version of the article. The definitive, peer-reviewed and edited version of this article is published here: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10113-017-1216-3
dc.subjectScience & Technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_NZ
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciencesen_NZ
dc.subjectEnvironmental Studiesen_NZ
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences & Ecologyen_NZ
dc.subjectFlood risk managementen_NZ
dc.subjectJusticeen_NZ
dc.subjectVulnerability and sensitivityen_NZ
dc.subjectFlood disadvantageen_NZ
dc.subjectENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDSen_NZ
dc.subjectPLANNING-THEORYen_NZ
dc.subjectENGLANDen_NZ
dc.subjectVULNERABILITYen_NZ
dc.subjectJUSTICEen_NZ
dc.subjectPOLICYen_NZ
dc.subjectEXPERTISEen_NZ
dc.subjectKNOWLEDGEen_NZ
dc.subjectRESPONSIBILITYen_NZ
dc.subjectUNCERTAINTYen_NZ
dc.titleBeyond 'just' flood risk management: the potential for-and limits to-alleviating flood disadvantageen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10113-017-1216-3en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfRegion Environmental Changeen_NZ
pubs.begin-page385
pubs.elements-id206576
pubs.end-page396
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume18en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn1436-378Xen_NZ


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