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dc.contributor.authorMasters-Awatere, Bridgetteen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCormack, Donnaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Rachelen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBoulton, Amohiaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorTangitu-Joseph, Makaritaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorRata, Aramaen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-15T22:16:03Z
dc.date.available2021-12-15T22:16:03Z
dc.date.issued2019en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/14692
dc.description.abstractFor Māori, as the Indigenous peoples of Aotearoa New Zealand, the care of those who are unwell has always been the concern of whānau (family) and community. Māori have established knowledge systems relating to health and wellbeing, and long-standing practices for both promoting good health and responding to illness (Taskforce on Whānau Centred Initiatives [hereafter referred to as the Taskforce], 2009; Waitangi Tribunal, 2001). These systems recognise the importance of relationships between peoples and broader environments to health and wellbeing (Mark & Lyons, 2010; Taskforce, 2009), something which has been more recently acknowledged in Māori health strategy and policy by government (Ministry of Health, 2014b).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNga Pae o te Maramatangaen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://ebooks.auckland.ac.nz/tearotahi_december_2019_no_4/en_NZ
dc.rights©2019 Ngā Pae o te Maramatanga. Used with permission.
dc.titleThe Hospital Transfers Project: Supporting whanau engagement during hospitalisationsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.relation.isPartOfTe Arotahien_NZ
pubs.elements-id250645
pubs.issue4en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ


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