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dc.contributor.advisorMurphy, Kane Ēnoka George
dc.contributor.authorRetikaukau, Georgia-Louise
dc.date.accessioned2023-09-25T03:01:42Z
dc.date.available2023-09-25T03:01:42Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/16050
dc.description.abstractSimilar to many other iwi (tribes) in Aotearoa, the Arawa people have a rich ancestral heritage that traces back to our origins in Hawaiki through our esteemed canoe traditions. However, within these narratives, the prominence of our heroic male ancestors tends to overshadow the stories of their wives, who are often mentioned merely as secondary characters. Te Kuraimonoa, Kearoa, and Whakaotirangi represent the first three women to be named in Te Arawa traditions, yet their narratives remain vague, existing only from a male perspective. Although their names can be found scattered throughout European and Māori literature, their stories are fragmented and incomplete, varying from tribe to tribe. The objective of this research is to delve into these three ancestresses' lives from a Te Arawa female perspective, aiming to provide a more comprehensive and nuanced understanding. Employing a mixed-method research approach, this study will investigate Māori and European literature, supplemented by thematical analysis to study and compare data gathered from interviews with female Te Arawa descendants. The insights gained from this endeavour will contribute to the creation of substantial knowledge that can benefit both present and future generations. Comprising of seven chapters, this thesis unfolds as follows: Chapter one introduces the research purpose and provides an overview of the subsequent chapters. Chapter two outlines the research methodology employed. Chapter three presents an in-depth exploration of Te Arawa iwi, elucidating their significance and cultural context. Chapter four encompasses a comprehensive literature review, while chapter five is solely dedicated to the insights derived from the interview dialogues. Chapter six delves into the findings and engages in detailed discussions, offering a comprehensive analysis. Lastly, chapter seven serves as the conclusion, summarizing the key findings and their implications.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.language.isomi
dc.publisherThe University of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectTe Arawa
dc.subjectWāhine Ariki Tapairu
dc.subjectTe Kuraimonoa
dc.subjectKearoa
dc.subjectWhakaotirangi
dc.subjectWahine Māori
dc.subjectPuhi Ariki
dc.subjectRuahine
dc.subjectMāreikura
dc.subjectCanoe Traditions
dc.subjectHawaiki
dc.subject.lcshTe Arawa (New Zealand people) -- Genealogy
dc.subject.lcshWomen, Māori -- History
dc.subject.lcshMāori (New Zealand people) -- Genealogy
dc.subject.lcshMythology, Māori
dc.subject.lcshWomen heroes -- New Zealand -- History
dc.titleNgā Wāhine Ariki Tapairu o Te Arawa: Te Kuraimonoa, Kearoa, Whakaotirangi
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (MA)
dc.date.updated2023-09-21T23:05:36Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subject.maoriWāhine
dc.subject.maoriWhakapapa
dc.subject.maoriPūrākau
dc.subject.maoriKōrero nehe


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