Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.authorMoffat, Kirstineen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2023-11-16T21:20:24Z
dc.date.available2023-11-16T21:20:24Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-26en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/16153
dc.description.abstractThis paper originates from my archival exploration of Gilbert and Sullivan, specifically Frank Rolleston's adaptation of Pirates of Penzance, a discovery pivotal for my chapter on Gilbert and Sullivan in colonial New Zealand. This led to a broader investigation into literary and musical responses to Parihaka, contemplating the appropriateness of capturing its essence. In 2019, reflecting on our national journey, I align with Ihimaera's perspective, acknowledging the justified anger at injustice but also embracing the optimism and hope—a new dawn after the dark night, symbolizing death, resurrection, and new life. The Maori proverb "Ko te poo e teiwi te kai hari te raa" encapsulates this sentiment, emphasizing that the night brings the day, and "Ko te mate te kai hari i te orange e au" asserts that death brings life.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsPresented at the Museum of New Zealand Te papa Tongarewa, Wellington on 26 Nov 2019. © 2019 The Author.
dc.sourceMuseum of New Zealand Te papa Tongarewa, Wellingtonen_NZ
dc.titleThe Pirates of Parihaka: Parody as a Response to Violenceen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution
pubs.elements-id259484


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record